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  • Updated 6 months ago - 412 words
    Although [Ag(en)]ClO 4 involves a normally bidentate ligand, in this case the structure is polymeric and the silver ion still retains a CN=2 with the N atoms (from different ligands) at ~180 degrees to each other. The cis- isomer is a powerful anti-cancer drug whereas the trans- is inactive. The classic example of optical isomerism in octahedral coordination complexes (H atoms not shown).
    http://chemwiki.ucdavis.edu/Inorganic_Chemistry/Coordination_Chemistry/Coordination_Numbers/Molecular_Examples
  • Updated 6 months ago - 407 words
    For a typical spin-allowed but Laporte (orbitally) forbidden transition in an octahedral complex, expect ε < 10 m 2 mol -1 . Extinction coefficients for tetrahedral complexes are expected to be around 50-100 times larger than for octrahedral complexes. B for first-row transition metal free ions is around 1000 cm -1 . Depending on the position of the ligand in the nephelauxetic series, this can be reduced to as low as 60% in the complex.
    http://chemwiki.ucdavis.edu/Physical_Chemistry/Spectroscopy/Electronic_Spectroscopy/Selection_Rules_for_Electronic_Spectra_of_Transition_Metal_Complexes
  • Updated 4 months ago - 1,733 words
    Elongation Jahn-Teller distortions occur when the degeneracy is broken by the stabilization (lowering in energy) of the d orbitals with a z component, while the orbitals without a z component are destabilized (higher in energy) as shown in Figure 2 below:
    http://chemwiki.ucdavis.edu/Inorganic_Chemistry/Coordination_Chemistry/Coordination_Numbers/Jahn-Teller_Distortions
  • Updated 1 month ago - 2,087 words
    In the laboratory course, it will have been pointed out that the "stability of a complex in solution" refers to the degree of association between the two species involved in the state of equilibrium. To form the tris-bidentate metal complex requires an initial collision for the first ligand to attach by one arm but remember that the other arm is always going to be nearby and only requires a rotation of the other end to enable the ligand to form the chelate ring.
    http://chemwiki.ucdavis.edu/Inorganic_Chemistry/Coordination_Chemistry/Ligands/Chelation
  • Updated 2 days ago - 861 words
    Based on the radius ratio, it can be seen that the bigger the charge on the central ion, the more attraction there will be for negatively charged ligands, however at the same time, the bigger the charge the smaller the ion becomes which then limits the number of groups able to coordinate.
    http://chemwiki.ucdavis.edu/Inorganic_Chemistry/Coordination_Chemistry/Coordination_Numbers
  • Updated 2 months ago - 2,086 words
    Canada is the world's leading nickel producer and the Sudbury Basin of Ontario contains one of the largest nickel deposits in the world. In the first step of the process, nickel oxide is reacted with water gas, a mixture of H 2 and CO, at atmospheric pressure and a temperature of 50 °C. The primary use of nickel is in the preparation of alloys such as stainless steel, which accounts for approximately 67% of all nickel used in manufacture.
    http://chemwiki.ucdavis.edu/Inorganic_Chemistry/Descriptive_Chemistry/Transition_Metals/Group_10%3A_Transition_Metals/The_Chemistry_of_Nickel
  • Updated 1 month ago - 3,331 words
    Trans isomers, on the other hand, are isomers where the two ligands are on opposite sides in a molecule because trans isomers have a bond angle of 180 o , between the two same atoms. On the other hand, if the mirror image cannot be rotated in any way such that it looks identical to the original molecule, then the molecule is said to be non-superimposable and the molecule has optical isomers.
    http://chemwiki.ucdavis.edu/Inorganic_Chemistry/Coordination_Chemistry/Isomers/Stereoisomers
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