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ChemWiki: The Dynamic Chemistry E-textbook > Development Details > Approaches > Demos > Additional Demos > The Preparation of Bakelite

The Preparation of Bakelite

Chemical Concept Demonstrated

  • Thermoset plastics

Demonstration

Formaldehyde is added to the beaker inside a fume hood.

Aniline hydrochloride (C6H5NH3Cl) is rapidly added.

beaker.gif

Observations

The polymer expands out of the beaker, along with a prodigious amount of heat.

Explanation

This reaction is highly exothermic, but that is not why the plastic produced is referred to as "thermoset".

Bakelite is a space-network polymer. Unlike linear and branched polymers, which are composed of long molecules that make them more or less crystalline, space-network polymers are highly and irregularly cross-linked throughout the structure. The sheer extent of the cross-linking means that a sample of the material is essentially one gigantic molecule.

Although heat softens and melts linear and branched polymers, heating does not soften space-network polymers because such a softening would require the breaking of covalent bonds.  In fact, heating usually produces additional cross-linking in these polymers, making them harder.  It is for this reason that space-network polymers, such as bakelite, are called thermoset plastics.

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Last Modified
10:31, 2 Oct 2013

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